Volusia County Historic Preservation Board

I am proud to announce that I have been appointed to the Volusia County Historic Preservation Board.  I consider this appointment to be quite an honor and I look forward to working with fine group who are already on the Board.

The Historic Preservation Board (HPB) is appointed by the Volusia County Council to issue certificates of designation for eligible historic resources (structures, archaeological sites, and historic districts) and certificates of appropriateness for demolition, alteration, relocation and new construction.

The HPB advises the County Council on all matters related to historic preservation policy, including use, management and maintenance of county-owned historic resources.

Library Additions–November 2016 (1)

Devils Walking: Klan Murders along the Mississippi in the 1960s
Devils Walking: Klan Murders along the Mississippi in the 1960s

Thank you to the good folks at LSU Press for sending a review copy of Devils Walking: Klan Murders along the Mississippi in the 1960s written by Stanley Nelson.

After midnight on December 10, 1964, in Ferriday, Louisiana, African American Frank Morris awoke to the sound of breaking glass. Outside his home and shoe shop, standing behind the shattered window, Klansmen tossed a lit match inside the store, now doused in gasoline, and instantly set the building ablaze. A shotgun pointed to Morris’s head blocked his escape from the flames. Four days later Morris died, though he managed in his last hours to describe his attackers to the FBI. Frank Morris’s death was one of several Klan murders that terrorized residents of northeast Louisiana and Mississippi, as the perpetrators continued to elude prosecution during this brutal era in American history.

In Devils Walking: Klan Murders along the Mississippi in the 1960s, Pulitzer Prize finalist and journalist Stanley Nelson details his investigation—alongside renewed FBI attention—into these cold cases, as he uncovers the names of the Klan’s key members as well as systemized corruption and coordinated deception by those charged with protecting all citizens.

Devils Walking recounts the little-known facts and haunting stories that came to light from Nelson’s hundreds of interviews with both witnesses and suspects. His research points to the development of a particularly virulent local faction of the Klan who used terror and violence to stop integration and end the advancement of civil rights. Secretly led by the savage and cunning factory worker Red Glover, these Klansmen—a handpicked group that included local police officers and sheriff’s deputies—discarded Klan robes for civilian clothes and formed the underground Silver Dollar Group, carrying a silver dollar as a sign of unity. Their eight known victims, mostly African American men, ranged in age from nineteen to sixty-seven and included one Klansman seeking redemption for his past actions.

Following the 2007 FBI reopening of unsolved civil rights–era cases, Nelson’s articles in the Concordia Sentinel prompted the first grand jury hearing for these crimes. By unmasking those responsible for these atrocities and giving a voice to the victims’ families, Devils Walking demonstrates the importance of confronting and addressing the traumatic legacy of racism.

Journal of Southern History–Volume LXXXII Number 4

Todays mail included the November 2016 Journal of Southern History published by the Southern Historical Association.

Articles include:

The Lizardi Brothers: A Mexican Family Business and the Expansion of New Orleans, 1825-1846 written by Linda Salvucci and Richard Salvucci.

The Old South Confronts the Dilemma of David Livingston written by Daniel Kilbride.

Conservatives in the Everglades: Sun Belt Environmentalism and the Creation of Everglades National Park written by Chris Wilhelm.

Green Civic Republicanism and Environmental Action Against Surface Mining in Lincoln County, West Virginia, 1974-1990 written by Jinny A. Turman.

Book Reviews (77 reviews)

Book Notes

Historical News and Notices

Florida Historical Quarterly–Volume 95 Number 1

The new issue of the Florida Historical Quarterly has arrived. Learn about subscribing here.

Contents include:

To Conquer the Coast: Pensacola, the Gulf of Mexico and the Construction of American Imperialism, 1820-1848 written by Maria Angela Diaz.

Losing Lincoln: Black Educators, Historical Memory, and the Desegregation of Lincoln High School in Gainesville, Florida written by Kathryn Palmer.

The Gulf Coast Fish Cheer: Radicalism and the Underground Press in Pensacola, Florida, 1970-1971 written by Christopher Satterwhite.

Book Reviews (ten titles are reviewed)

End Notes