Library Additions–November 2018 (3)

Thank you to LSU Press for providing review copies of two new books. Both look quite interesting.

The American South and the Great War, 1914-1924 edited by Matthew L. Downs and M. Ryan Floyd.

Edited by Matthew L. Downs and M. Ryan Floyd, The American South and the Great War, 1914–1924 investigates how American participation in World War I further strained the region’s relationship with the federal government, how wartime hardships altered the South’s traditional social structure, and how the war effort stressed and reshaped the southern economy. The volume contends that participation in World War I contributed greatly to the modernization of the South, initiating changes ultimately realized during World War II and the postwar era. Although the war had a tremendous impact on the region, few scholars have analyzed the topic in a comprehensive fashion, making this collection a much-needed addition to the study of American and southern history.

These essays address a variety of subjects, including civil rights, economic growth and development, politics and foreign policy, women’s history, gender history, and military history. Collectively, this volume highlights a time and an experience often overshadowed by later events, illustrating the importance of World War I in the emergence of a modern South.

Hardcover. 248 pages, index, each entry with own end notes. ISBN 9780807169377, $47.

Upon the Fields of Battle: Essays on the Military History of America’s Civil War (Conflicting Worlds: New Dimensions of the American Civil War) edited by Andrew S. Bledsoe and Andrew F. Lang  with a forward by Gary W. Gallagher.

New developments in Civil War scholarship owe much to removal of artificial divides by historians seeking to explore the connections between the home front and the battlefield. Indeed, scholars taking a holistic view of the war have contributed to our understanding of the social complexities of emancipation—of freedom in a white republic—and the multifaceted experiences of both civilians and soldiers. Given these accomplishments, research focusing on military history prompts prominent and recurring debates among Civil War historians. Critics of traditional military history see it as old-fashioned, too technical, or irrelevant to the most important aspects of the war. Proponents of this area of study view these criticisms as a misreading of its nature and potential to illuminate the war. The collected essays in Upon the Fields of Battle bridge this intellectual divide, demonstrating how historians enrich Civil War studies by approaching the period through the specific but nonetheless expansive lens of military history.

Drawing together contributions from Keith Altavilla, Robert L. Glaze, John J. Hennessy, Earl J. Hess, Brian Matthew Jordan, Kevin M. Levin, Brian D. McKnight, Jennifer M. Murray, and Kenneth W. Noe, editors Andrew S. Bledsoe and Andrew F. Lang present an innovative volume that deeply integrates and analyzes the ideas and practices of the military during the Civil War. Furthermore, by grounding this collection in both traditional and pioneering methodologies, the authors assess the impact of this field within the social, political, and cultural contexts of Civil War studies.

Upon the Fields of Battle reconceives traditional approaches to subjects like battles and battlefields, practice and policy, command and culture, the environment, the home front, civilians and combatants, atrocity and memory, revealing a more balanced understanding of the military aspects of the Civil War’s evolving history.

Hardcover. 304 pages, index, each entry with own end notes. ISBN 9780807169773, $48.

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World War I Centennial Event in Geneva, FL

Press release from the Geneva Historical & Genealogical Society:

leinster-colour-40~ Oct. 10, Wed. – Come to a WWI Centennial Memorial for Perry Taylor of Geneva and the other 500+ who died on the RMS Leinster in the Irish Sea on Oct. 10, 1918, when it was hit by 3 German torpedoes just before the end of WWI. Memorials are being held in Ireland and other Allied countries on the same day. Most of those killed were military young men and women. It is at 2:00 PM, in Geneva Cemetery, Cemetery Road, off 1st Street. Come honor those who died as well as our military men and women from WWI buried in Geneva. We are the only U.S. community having the Memorial for the 6 U.S. soldiers who drowned.

New World War I Related Exhibit at Musee de l’Armee Invalides

A major new exhibition at the Musée de l’Armée (if you visit the museum website you may translate to English through the drop down menu in the upper right corner) opening musee de l'armee invalidesin October will retrace the reorganization of the Eastern Europe and the Near East from 1918 with the loose conglomeration of disturbances, violence and instability. The exhibition will explore this little-known period in history marked by revolutions, civil wars, major border shifts and the creation of new states.

While the conflicts came to an end on 11 November 1918 in Western Europe, the Great War allowed in the East until 1923. This exhibition is a unique opportunity to understand the complex struggles of the Eastern Europe and the Near East whose repercussions can still be seen today.

In the wake of the fall of the empires – Russian, Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian and German – some new countries were created by treaties which were soon contested. The Treaty of Sèvre, signed on 10 August 1920 by Turkey and the Allies, was replaced by the Treaty of Lausanne, signed on 24 July 1923.

The exhibition sets out to show how, in this troubled context of the resolution of the First World War, France tried, with some difficulty, to put its military dominance to use in bringing stability to the region within a complex partnership of allies.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE

Press Release: Forgotten Soldiers of World War I

ATGLEN, PA – Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. would like to introduce Forgotten Soldiers of World War I: America’s Immigrant Doughboys  by Alexander F. Barnes & Peter L. Belmonte.

“A really well researched book. This book tells about the nationalities of the soldiers who were in the American Army in the First World War. It tells us where they were from, where they fought and what happened to them. This is a fascinating read about bravery and men who sacrificed so much to fight for a country they wanted to belong to. This is a fascinating and insightful read” – NetGalley reviewer.
This book covers the entire spectrum of military service during World War I. It gives examples, including many photographs, from almost every ethnic and national group in the United States during this time. Including draft registration, induction and training, stateside service, overseas service, combat, return home, and discharge, learn the history of America’s foreign-born soldiers during World War I and how they adapted to military service to become part of the successful American Expeditionary Forces.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Alexander F. Barnes served in the Marine Corps and Army National Guard, retiring as a Chief Warrant Officer. He retired as a Department of the Army Civilian in 2015 and is currently the Virginia National Guard Command Historian. He holds a master’s degree in anthropology and has authored: In a Strange Land; The American Occupation of Germany 1918-1923 (2010), Let’s Go! The History of the 29th Division 1917-2001 (2014), To Hell with the Kaiser, America prepares for War (2015), and Desert Uniforms, Patches, and Insignia of the US Armed Forces (Schiffer Publishing 2016).Peter L. Belmonte is a retired U.S. Air Force officer and freelance historian. A veteran of Operation Desert Storm, he holds a master’s degree in history from California State University, Stanislaus. He has published articles, book chapters, reviews, and papers about immigration and military history and has been a college adjunct instructor of history. Pete has written two books: Italian Americans in World War II (2001) and Days of Perfect Hell: The U.S. 26th Infantry Regiment in the Meuse-Argonne Offensive, October-November, 1918 (Schiffer Publishing, 2015)

Library Additions-December 2015 (2)

Here’s a special look at the many wonderful books I received as Christmas presents. I think I am going to be pretty busy!

For Us the Living: The Civil War in Paintings and Eyewitness Accounts–This beautiful book is illustrated by Mort Kunstler.

Whitey: The Life of America’s Most Notorious Mob Boss and John Wayne Gacy: Defending a Monster from my wife’s nephew. True crime is generally not my big area of reading interest but I have to give him credit, both look interesting so I think he did pretty well.

The Witches: Salem, 1692 I know author Stacy Schiff has taken some criticism for her writing style. I am inclined however to give her the benefit of the doubt based upon professional reviews. Salem was on the short list for vacation this year so this is a perfect book to maybe put the area over the top in the next couple years.

Mr. Flagler’s St. Augustine (A Florida Quincentennial Book) Having written about St. Augustine it’s no shock I would want to read this book by Dr. Thomas Graham, an excellent historian of the city.

Florida Indians and the Invasion from Europe An area I really need to learn more about for my job.

The War That Ended Peace: The Road to 1914 A time period I don’t know anywhere near enough about. Having looked through it for quite a while at B&N and based upon the reviews I am very happy to have received it.

Shiloh: Conquer or Perish (Modern War Studies) A recent quick trip to the Shiloh battlefield has led to an interest in this engagement. It looks like there is no better author than Timothy B. Smith (not to be confused with the Tim Smith who is a Gettysburg expert).