New Book on World War II Era Sherman Tanks

ATGLEN, PA – Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. would like to introduce Sherman Tank Vol. 1: America’s M4A1 Medium Tank in World War II (Legends of Warfare: Ground) by David Doyle.

This book documents the development and production of the M4A1 through its many variations, as well as its combat use around the globe. Produced by Lima Locomotive Works, Pressed Steel Car Company, and Pacific Car and Foundry, the M4A1 was the first of the famed Sherman tanks and preceded the welded-hull M4 into production. Powered by a nine-cylinder, air-cooled radial engine, the M4A1 fought in North Africa with both US and British forces, across northwestern Europe, and on Pacific Islands with both the Army and the Marines, serving well into the 1950s. The evolving design went through three major hull designs, multiple turret designs, and armament with either a 75 mm or 76 mm gun—all of which are detailed in this book. Extensive archival photographs are augmented by stunning color images of preserved tanks, taking the reader around and inside this famed warhorse. Part of the Legends of Warfare series.

David Doyle’s earliest published works appeared in periodicals aimed at the historic military vehicle restoration hobby. By 1999, this included regular features in leading hobby publications, appearing regularly in US, English and Polish magazines. Since 2003, over 100 of his books have been published. Broadening his horizons from his inital efforts concerning vehicles, he soon added aircraft and warships to his research objectives.

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New World War I Related Exhibit at Musee de l’Armee Invalides

A major new exhibition at the Musée de l’Armée (if you visit the museum website you may translate to English through the drop down menu in the upper right corner) opening musee de l'armee invalidesin October will retrace the reorganization of the Eastern Europe and the Near East from 1918 with the loose conglomeration of disturbances, violence and instability. The exhibition will explore this little-known period in history marked by revolutions, civil wars, major border shifts and the creation of new states.

While the conflicts came to an end on 11 November 1918 in Western Europe, the Great War allowed in the East until 1923. This exhibition is a unique opportunity to understand the complex struggles of the Eastern Europe and the Near East whose repercussions can still be seen today.

In the wake of the fall of the empires – Russian, Ottoman, Austro-Hungarian and German – some new countries were created by treaties which were soon contested. The Treaty of Sèvre, signed on 10 August 1920 by Turkey and the Allies, was replaced by the Treaty of Lausanne, signed on 24 July 1923.

The exhibition sets out to show how, in this troubled context of the resolution of the First World War, France tried, with some difficulty, to put its military dominance to use in bringing stability to the region within a complex partnership of allies.

READ THE PRESS RELEASE

Rufus Pinkney Mural Unveiled in DeLand

RufusWe all live somewhere; whether it be a town, village, or city; urban or rural, small town or giant metropolis. What makes it home though is a sense of community. Men like Rufus Pinkney are what makes a community.

You don’t know who Rufus Pinkney was? Well you must not have lived in DeLand, Florida at any time for the past sixty odd years. Rufus was an institution in the downtown area. Even if you didn’t know his name you knew who he was. He was a local legend. Was he a sports star? Was he a political figure or a prominent banker or lawyer? No. Mr. Pinkney shined shoes. That’s right. He shined shoes and he was a more beloved representative of small town community than any sports star could be.

Rufus was born June 12, 1932 in Palatka to parents Pearl and Rufus Pinkney. As a child the family moved to Miami before Rufus left south Florida, ending up in Mississippi where he met his future wife, Mary Louise Gray. Rufus and Mary had two children; a daughter Sharon and a son, also named Rufus.

Pinkney operated his shoe shine business out of a small building located in the parkingRufus 2 lot near 127 E. New York Avenue. Here, according to a Daytona Beach News-Journal article “…is a jumble of polishes, brushes, calendars, shelves of gleaming shoes, and more signs. One praises him as the “Master Engineer in Charge of Preserving the Primary Means of Personal Locomotion,’ and a bulletin board [was] thickly thumbtacked with business cards.” His shop was most recently adorned with a sign painted by Stephen Danko showing an alligator shoe with the words “Shoes Shined by Rufus”. Mark Lane of the News-Journal reports that Pinkney had shined shoes in Deland since 1955 and before that in St. Augustine at the old railroad station.

In addition to his skill at shining shoes, Rufus was a well-known local harmonica player and received the gift of being a great conversationalist. He was an elder at Greater Refuge Church of Our Lord Jesus Christ. When you saw him he was always dressed well and of course his shoes were never scuffed.

Rufus passed away September 12, 2016 after suffering a stroke. In his 84 years though he touched many lives. Personally, I can remember Rufus from back in the late 1980’s and early 90’s when I worked in downtown DeLand. He used to always stop in for his daily coffee. Sometimes more than once a day would we see him. He never really lingered long though he was always pleasant and had a smile and kind word for everyone. He couldn’t linger because he was busy. He had to get back to the shop and take care of business.

Recently the City of DeLand unveiled a mural in Mr. Pinkey’s honor near where his popular shoe shine stand used to be. It is only fitting that he be remembered in this way. Please read more about the mural unveiling and see several photos here.